Ain’t Got No More Lip

Find out about the status of conch in The Bahamas and get some ideas about to make sure its still around for the next generation. We want to hear what you think, make sure to comment! This video was produced by Community Conch in support of the National Conchservation Campaign led by the Bahamas National […]

Find out about the status of conch in The Bahamas and get some ideas about to make sure its still around for the next generation. We want to hear what you think, make sure to comment!

This video was produced by Community Conch in support of the National Conchservation Campaign led by the Bahamas National Trust.

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7 Responses to “Ain’t Got No More Lip”

  1. yanuvi says:

    it is the right step, in the right way!!!

  2. The more info to the public and fisherman the better. Some fisherman will never care, those are the few the law must deal with. Lets seed the Northern Bahama Bank and eat conch, AT HOME, for years to come.

  3. Barry says:

    Great video. I was curious, how much is exported and how much is consumed in the Bahamas? I would guess the export market is putting the largest dent in the conch population.

    The protected seeding areas sounds like a good idea.

  4. Anonymous says:

    As a recent tourist to the Bahamas, I was concerned about rules and regulations on wildlife, especially the removal of live animals. I asked around and was surprised to find that I was told that there were no regulations to worry about. This was communicated by an islander. I first visited the islands in 1978 and can see drastic changes in the underwater ecosystem. I told my children on this trip (4 teenagers) that they could look at the conch, helmets, crabs, fish, ect but that they would stay in the ocean. Unfortunately, we saw several vacationers removing live animals. My children began finding live animals and moving them to deeper water so beach goers would have a tougher time finding them. My suggestion is educate the tourists. Start a campaign at the airports; let them know what is allowed and not allowed. Maybe it starts with conch and eventually can move onto more wildlife. I don’t think that most people know that a shell can be an extension of a living organism. Continue to educate all Bahamian residents and empower them to communicate that to vacationers, possibly lobbying for resorts to get on board as well. In no time, the word would spread and hopefully this could help make a difference as well.

  5. Sandy Gorski says:

    As a recent tourist to the Bahamas, I was concerned about rules and regulations on wildlife, especially the removal of live animals. I asked around and was surprised to find that I was told that there were no regulations to worry about. This was communicated by an islander. I first visited the islands in 1978 and can see drastic changes in the underwater ecosystem. I told my children on this trip (4 teenagers) that they could look at the conch, helmets, crabs, fish, ect but that they would stay in the ocean. Unfortunately, we saw several vacationers removing live animals. My children began finding live animals and moving them to deeper water so beach goers would have a tougher time finding them. My suggestion is educate the tourists. Start a campaign at the airports; let them know what is allowed and not allowed. Maybe it starts with conch and eventually can move onto more wildlife. I don’t think that most people know that a shell can be an extension of a living organism. Continue to educate all Bahamian residents and empower them to communicate that to vacationers, possibly lobbying for resorts to get on board as well. In no time, the word would spread and hopefully this could help make a difference as well.

  6. Nicholas says:

    One piece of the conservation puzzle would involve getting more people involved in protecting this resource. I suggest we design, sell & give away a beautifully designed keychain of a conch shell to consumers and other concerned stakeholders with a15mm gauge incorporated into the design. What that would do is arm the average consumer with the tool they need to police the industry themselves. It could easily be the norm that we purchase conch products “fresh” i.e. in the shell. Those on the frontline of Conch conservation may be aware that preserving this resource for future generations also appeals to a broad spectrum of individuals even those who do not consume conch but for many other reasons. For me it’s about marine diversity, thriving ecosystems & stewardship of the environment.
    Another suggestion would be to make the conch iconic. Through the use of art, design, marketing, & other pop culture mediums, awareness could be heightened. I would wear a conch t-shirt, or other conch branded apparel, I could go on & on…

  7. […] Video at Conch Salad TV. By nlmccoy|2013-03-28T12:09:53+00:00March 28th, 2013|Conch, Invertebrates|0 Comments […]

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