Lighthouses of The Bahamas

Lighthouses of the Bahamas are an iconic symbol of the country’s history. The Bahamas has the only remaining hand cranked light houses in the world.  See them lit by the keepers, learn their stories and let us know if you think they should be saved. This video features interviews with Dave Gale of the Bahamas […]

Lighthouses of the Bahamas are an iconic symbol of the country’s history. The Bahamas has the only remaining hand cranked light houses in the world.  See them lit by the keepers, learn their stories and let us know if you think they should be saved.

This video features interviews with Dave Gale of the Bahamas Lighthouse Preservation Society, as well as Hope Town Lighthouse Keepers Franklyn Sweeting and Jeffery Forbes Jr. and former lighthouse keeper Caiaphas.

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33 Responses to “Lighthouses of The Bahamas”

  1. Richard Mauney says:

    Save The lighthouses! have seen the one in Hopetown many times.

  2. Tim Boyle says:

    Do whatever it takes to save all the lighthouses !

  3. Jay Zimmerman says:

    My family and I have benn visiting the Abaco s for 15 years. One of, if not the main reason we choose to come to places like Hope Town, is because of the poeple, and their culture. If I want modern places, beaches , etc. I’ll stay in the husle and busle of the USA. We support places like Hope Town and the light house. They are truly a treasure!

  4. Anonymous says:

    Keep em’ all!

  5. Barry Gorman says:

    Keep the lighthouses, get rid of the politicians!

  6. Marysa says:

    Save the lighthouses!! Don’t let history be lost!

  7. JTR Group says:

    The lighthouses are part of our history. It can also be considered part of our coulture. It is part of us; who we are as a people; and indeed part of that which makes us different It is part of the ‘old charm’ that keeps people coming back. It is history. And once lost, or allowed to fade into oblivion, we may never get it back.

    Further, what backup do we have if GPS and the like fail. We cannot throw the ‘baby out with the bath’, just because new technology is here. Lighthouses in The Bahamas are our ‘fail safe’ mechanism.

    I say Save the Lighthouses. I am ready to contribute to a Save the Lighouse fund. The Minister of Culture needs to jump on something like this. And the Ministry should ensure that this kind of Bahamian history is taught in schools. Do not allow that which is an integral part of our history to die. It will be a travesty!

  8. Rick Lowe says:

    Great work!
    I’ve embedded it at http://www.weblogbahamas.com for later.
    Thanks for all your effort.

  9. WIlliam Butler says:

    I feel as a Bahamian who use to be a fisherman i would be a good idea to protect and keep the lighthouses working for the marina. Traveling on the sea at night can be a trying experiance, sure we have GPS today but even with GPS we who travel at see alway rely on our eyes and our lines of sight. There are times you will need the Light House to get your bearing especially at night or in stormy weather.

  10. Cpt.Greene says:

    Yes we need the lighthouses because sometime your system can fail on your ship an if your near to land a lighthouse can to the way to know how far you are from land…..

  11. peter says:

    reminder its a land mark

  12. E.D. Gibson says:

    Lighthouses should be preserved as they are an integral part of our history as an island nation.The one at Hope Towm has such historical and nautical importance that it should be ,if it hasn’t,vied for a UNESCO world heritage site.The Bahamas is rich with history yet we take so much for granted and wonder why the younger genration seem so lost.One of the reason is that they have no identity because they don’t know their real history.Bahamians seem to think that our history began in 1967 forever putting a political yoke around our necks.Save The Lighthouses by doing this we save a piece of ourselves.

    • Malee says:

      Hi Gloria,Thanks for your thoughtful comnmets! They don’t care about your knowledge until they see that you will take the time and take action because you care. There is a saying in the conscious business world, People don’t care how much you know until they know how much you care. I find that my business grows when I earn people’s trust and respect by showing up with an open heart. That’s an essential part of success in today’s economy. And, it’s challenging because like you said: My world is surrounded by people in chaos right now. There is a great deal of intensity and conflict. Learning tools for dealing with the strong emotional energies that accompany our time is essential!Appreciate your time and good thinking Gloria!Warmly,Paul

  13. Ena Whiteland says:

    Made my comments, and posted to Facebook!!

  14. Melissa Maura says:

    Our beautiful lighthouses represent an important part of our history. They are so worthy of repair and maintenance and it kills me to see them go the way of so many of our historical buildings. My favourite lighthouse is Bird Rock in Crooked Island – it must have been magnificent in it’s day, with it’s cellars, roomy interiors with fire-places and incredible brick-work. Bird Rock still has all the romance and mystery about a remote out-post as it rests atop a tiny cay which is host to many nesting sea birds. I would hate to see us lose these amazing structures. Wake up Bahamas Government and put some effort and cash into our lighthouses and restore them for future generations and for tourist sites! Thank you Conch Salad for reminding us that they are still there, guiding us spiritually through shallow seas at night….

  15. Stephen Albury says:

    I am certainly in favour of preserving the lighthouses of The Bahamas. They are a part of our history. It’s unfortunate most are so remote for many to see but that’s the very nature of a lighthouse…located in a remote place.
    My mother was born and raised in Hope Town and she loved ‘her’ lighthouse.
    I would be prepared to donate to a ‘restoration and maintenance fund’ and I know it would be an expensive undertaking, but perhaps if the private sector and government cooperated in the effort, it would be possible.

  16. Barbara McMahon says:

    Although I have been away from the Bahamas for many years – my roots remain there and I find it so sad and soul destroying that the Bahamian Government do not do more to preserve the heritage of our beautiful islands. The Lighthouses must be one of the remaining historic sites in the Bahamas tht reflect the life of Bahamians. Please reserve the lighthouses of the BAhamas so that future generations can benefit from their historic value.

  17. Hida Ingraham-Kempski says:

    Thank you Conch Salad for creating this short video bringing awareness to all Bahamians and residents throughout the Bahamas
    of the plight of our beloved Lighthouses.
    We must do everything in our power to preserve these historical landmarks at all costs as they play a very significant role in our culture and identity as a nation of seafaring people.
    I am in full agreement of preserving our Lighthouses.Will gladly assist with any efforts in any way I can for this most worthy cause.
    The Bahamian Goverment needs to be actively involved in this project.
    Keep up the good work Conch Salad. Let’s make it happen!

  18. Derek Hare says:

    A fascinating film which clearly explains the great significance these wonderful lighthouses hold in the maritime history of the Bahamas. They are iconic. Having visited both Hole in the Wall and Hope Town lights several times over the last 20+ years,I still love the thrill when they hove into sight and can’t wait to show friends these magnificent structures when they come to visit.

    The campaign to save the lighthouses must gather momentum and I agree with others who call for the Bahamian Government to support this. I would be most willing to support this campaign. Coming from the north east of England, I recall that a relative of mine was keeper of the Low Light, one of three lights which guided vessels into the mouth of the River Tyne. So, let’s also not forget the individuals who still man the lights and the stirling job they do.

  19. Oswald Hall says:

    Absolutely fantastic….My father was the lighthouse keeper at Hog Island from 1947 to 1965. Our family was large, 9 children during the period we lived at the keepers residence. We all feel very fortunate for the experience and how it shape our lives directly.

    In it’s own way Hog Island Lighthouse is a witness to the changes that we, as Bahamians, have experienced from a front row seat. Today, this lighthouse is shining a light on the state of our society and country.

    Needless to say “I would be privileged to make a contribution to this effort.”

    Thank you

  20. tommy Bunch says:

    Not a choice,The light houses MUST be saved. Thanks for your effort in this. Tax dollars must be used. They are visual history for education.

  21. Donnie Carey says:

    The Bahamas has a vast and rich maritime history. It would be wonderful if we could save all of the Imperial lighthouses in the country, but at the very least, we should restore the very first lighthouse built at Hole-In-The-Wall, to it’s original glory. Construction of this silent sentinel was completed in late 1836. It has a special place in my heart, as one of my ancestors was commissioned to serve there on June 1, 1837.
    We need to do everything possible to make the public aware of the present plight of these magnificent structures, that helped save many souls from the dangerous reefs.

  22. Edward Malone says:

    My Grandfather was the Hope Town Light keeper for a number of years.
    Growing up, the Tower was a very important Land Mark, not only used to aid Mariners , but was a news Broadcaster in its own right.
    Hope Town Locals all have an intricate Past with The Beautiful Red and White Candy Striped Tower.
    Mariners knew where they were if they encountered the Five Flashes within a determined interval. That signaled they were near the Elbow Cay Coast.

  23. ronnie sands says:

    hope town. is known for it lighthouse. keep it. that way.

  24. Kevin Lightbourn says:

    SAVE THE LIGHTHOUSES!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  25. Dianne Boomhower says:

    My sister Jenny Gale has the opportunity to look at the Elbow Reef Light every day of her life. If it was gone, Hope Town would just not be the same. I will be there for a visit next week and one of the first things I want to do is go up into the lighthouse.
    YES! Save the lights! They are historical monuments!

  26. shirley cartwright says:

    I think the lighthouses should be preserved, we have preserved so little of our heritage lets make a great effort to keep these gentle giants

  27. Dee Freeman says:

    Save The Lighthouses! Theres so Much Money put into Things of This World thats Not Needed And When theres History of Something Like Lighthouses That have So Much Meaning Let’s Put the Money into Them.

  28. Jack Mangus says:

    As a member of countless American lighthouse groups from the U.S. Lighthouse Society to my “home” light organization at Ponce Inlet, Florida, as well as the Bahamas Lighthouse Preservation Society and lighthouses fill my every day thoughts. I support the lighthouse organizations to the best of my ability due to my love for all lighthouses and my concern for their preservation.

  29. charlene says:

    I think we should work to save the lighthouses the lighthouse’s are our pass an they will light the way forward. An I am looking forward to visiting some of them if not all.

  30. Rudi Verspoor says:

    Yes, both for the history and the present (tourism), and for their connection with the community they have been part of (particularly here in Hope Town) – they should be preserved, but it is likely private initiative that will do this in the end.

  31. […] Did you know that the lighthouse on paradise island is the oldest in the Bahamas? It was built in 1817 which makes it 197 years old this year. The lighthouse has withstood 25 major hurricanes since it was built its strongest recorded winds were 160mph of the 1932 hurricane but most devastating was the 1929 hurricane that claimed seven lives. Although hurricanes were commonly named official names were not given by the National Hurricane center until 1953 hence no known name for the 1929 hurricane. Shipwrecking was still a viable business when the lighthouse built but it wasn’t until the 1860′s that abolish of shipwrecking end and the building of lighthouses beginning with Abaco begun. There is little public knowledge on the specifics of the lighthouse more research must be done. You can learn more about lighthouses here Conch Salad Tv […]

  32. […] Did you know that the lighthouse on paradise island is the oldest in the Bahamas? It was built in 1817 which makes it 197 years old this year. The lighthouse has withstood 25 major hurricanes since it was built its strongest recorded winds were 160mph of the 1932 hurricane but most devastating was the 1929 hurricane that claimed seven lives. Although hurricanes were commonly named official names were not given by the National Hurricane center until 1953 hence no known name for the 1929 hurricane. Shipwrecking was still a viable business when the lighthouse built but it wasn't until the 1860's that abolish of shipwrecking end and the building of lighthouses beginning with Abaco begun. There is little public knowledge on the specifics of the lighthouse more research must be done. You can learn more about lighthouses here Conch Salad Tv […]

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